PLNY Blog

Video
by Gina Malin, Executive Director and Elaine Perlman, School Advisor

Executive Director Gina Malin sits down with Parents League School Advisor Elaine Perlman to talk about how parents can better communicate with children.

How we talk to kids can determine their behavior. Here are Elaine's recommendations for fostering learning, care, empathy and closeness:

Article
by SERENA FINE ENGLISH, Director, The William Woodward, Jr. Nursery School

A good nursery school is one which addresses all areas of children’s development, enhances their strengths, helps them to work on areas that may be harder for them, and prepares them well for future academic experiences.

Most important, however, is a school’s emphasis on instilling character and empathy towards others. While some children seem to have an unusual capacity to empathize with others, empathy is not only an innate quality: it is a combination of what children learn at home and at school.

Article
by SUSAN H. SHAPIRO, Former Director Dillon Child Study Center, St. Joseph's College

Along with the idea of romantic love, she was introduced to
another—physical beauty. Probably the most destructive ideas in
the history of human thought. Both originated in envy, thrived in
insecurity, and ended in disillusion.
                                                 —
Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

Article
by WILLIAM V.N. PHILIP, Headmaster, Westminster School

Westminster School’s motto is Grit & Grace—two words that balance each other alliteratively, but far more importantly, complement each other inspirationally. Reflections about grit focus mostly on individual improvement, whereas grace emphasizes the importance of making a difference for others and possibly leading a more fulfilling and gratifying life.

Article
by MARK MITCHELL, Vice President, School & Student Services

There is no denying that recent pricing trends make the independent school choice seem less financially viable for many families. During the past decade, the tuition price tag has increased at significant rates. Data gathered by the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) show that the median tuition for all independent schools (of all types and grade levels) rose by nearly 50% during that time. For families in New York City’s day schools, the news is worse. In these schools, the median tuition has risen over 70%, from $21,189 in 2003-04 to $35,104 in 2012-13.