Publications

Parents League of New York supports families and children by providing a broad range of educational and parenting resources. Each year we draw on our unequaled experience and affiliations to develop and offer a wide array of printed and online publications.  

Included with Membership:

Parents League Review: All members receive a copy of the latest issue of the Review, our annual journal on education and parenting. Learn more about the Review. This publicaion is also available for purchase. $25.00 plus $4.00 shipping. Purchase online, or call our office at 212-737-7385.

Guide to New York City Preschools: The only annually updated New York City preschool guide with nearly 300 listings. Families with young children receive this publication with membership.

Let's Play: a comprehensive listing activities for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Families with young children receive this publication with membership.

Online School Directory: Featuring over 300 Parents League Member Schools including independent and private preschools, elementary schools, middle schools, high schools and special needs schools in New York City and the surrounding area and boarding schools across the country and abroad.

Available for Purchase:

Parents League Review: All members receive a copy of the latest edition of the Review, our annual journal on education and parenting in January. Learn more about the Review. This publicaion is also available for purchase to the public. $25.00 plus $4.00 shipping. Purchase online, or call our office at 212-737-7385.

Looking for the New York Independent Schools Directory? As of January 2018, the directory is available only online. Click here to access the online directory at isaagny.org

Parents League also provides a searchable directory of member schools to family members. Not a member? Join today to access the Parents League School Directory.

PLNY Blog

by Lydia Spinelli, Director, The Brick Church School

Although young children may not remember or understand everything they learn about children who live far away, exposure to them may create the disposition to be a global citizen and a feeling of responsibility to help those who have so much less than they do.

by Scott R. Reisinger, Head, Trevor Day School

Each year thousands of parents make one of the most important decisions of their lives: To which school shall I send my child? This question reflects our concerns, worries and anxieties about competition and what we hold dear, speaking to our very core values. Where can my child find both academic success, and the pursuit of happiness? This individual decision making reflects one of the essential debates going on in a larger scale in American schooling: Can a school be a place of both academic rigor and happiness?