Founded in 1913 as a coalition of parents and independent and private schools, the Parents League of New York supports families and children by providing a broad range of educational and parenting resources.

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School Fair

Membership for Schools

If you represent an independent or private school click here to learn how to apply for School Membership, or call us at 212-737-7385. Annual membership dues are based on the total enrollment of the school.

Benefits
  • Annual School Fairs
  • Panel Presentations for Prospective Parents
  • Member School Directory and Publications
  • Online Member School Directory
  • Advisory Services
  • Grade Openings
  • Workshops and Forums
  • Spring Reception

More Information about Memberships for Schools

Family Membership

Take advantage of our many benefits including school admissions advice, events and publications.

  • $200 membership expires 6/30/2017
  • $400 membership expires 6/30/2019

Become a member now!

Benefits
  • School Advisory Appointments and Workshops
  • Lectures, Panels and Events on Parenting and Education
  • Parents League Publications
  • Online School Directory
  • Camp Advice and Information
  • Office Bulletin Board and Tutoring File

More Information about Family Memberships

Upcoming Events

Speaker:
Joan Cade, MS, LP, NCPsyA
Venue:
Parents League Office
115 East 82nd Street
New York, NY 11206
United States
When:
Thursday, January 26, 2017
Time:
9:30am - 11:00am
FULLY BOOKED
Venue:
Parents League Office
115 East 82nd Street
between Park & Lexington Avenues, first floor
New York, NY 10028
United States
When:
Monday, February 13, 2017
Time:
12:00pm - 1:30pm

PLNY Blog

In this modern age of distraction, many parents and teachers are concerned about the short and long term effects of electronic over-usage combined with academic, family, peer and extra-curricular stress. 
 Based on his book, CrazyBusy, Dr.

by CAROLYN SALZMAN, Head of School, The Gateway Schools (Review 2015)

You make decisions for your child every day. You choose his food, his playmates, his clothes. You expect to make these choices; in fact, you hardly think about them because they are grounded in your experience and guided by your vision for your family. There is one decision, however, that you may not have expected you would have to make: mainstream or special education.